Special Features

Jolly Boat

Traditionally, a jolly boat was a type of ship’s boat in use during the 18th and 19th centuries. The term ‘jolly boat’ originates in the Swedish jolle, a term meaning a small bark or boat. Jolly boats were usually the smallest type of boat carried on ships, and were generally between 16 and 18 feet long, clinker-built and propelled by four or six oars. When not in use the jolly boat normally hung from davits at the stern of a ship, and could be hoisted into and out of the water. Jolly boats were used for transporting goods and people, the Captain in particular, to and from shore, and for carrying out inspections of the ship. La Bohème’s jolly boat is a work of art in itself. Plus, she responds easily to the oar, both sculling and rowing, and is a handy sailor with a rudder, mast and two sails. The oars are set between traditional thole pins, and the boat itself is easily managed afloat by one person, including hoisting back to the davits.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner

La Bohème’s beautiful jolly boat and her proud Swedish builder.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner

A good jolly boat should be easy for a skilled seaman to manage.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner

The pirate captain and his eager crew go ashore.

Brass Binnacle

La Bohème’s brass binnacle is one of the most unique models seen today. It has two light covers, fore and aft, for viewing from any angle. Unusually, there are two vented candle boxes, also suitable for oil lamps. The whole piece is beautifully crafted and in very good condition. There is a permanent ring mount on the coach house roof, onto which the binnacle can be seated securely. For obvious reasons, the binnacle is normally dismounted and stored in the Captain’s cabin when crew leave the ship. A crafted wooden cap is used to protect the deck mounting ring. Keeping up a shine is a job for eager crew expecting an extra tot of rum.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner

A classic companion for the helmsman.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner

A little polishing creme applied in good time.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner

Beautifully crafted and maintained.

Johansson Pump Capstan Winch

Mounted on a massive oak sampson post, rising off the keelson, this traditional winch mechanism was made for the vessel in 1913 by Johannson of Karlshamn. To operate it, the cast iron head is pumped like a see-saw, using two long levers – steel shafts with wooden handles (not shown) – which drive iron rods down to the twinned iron gear wheels and turn the wooden drums. A double slat ratchet locks the drums each cog and, by lifting the flat bars, the whole load can be released instantly. This is vintage failsafe technology that is as good today as it was when installed over 100 years ago.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner

The cast iron winch capstan head is finely wrought.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner

The whole winch and drum mechanism is strong and simple.

Admiralty Anchors

La Bohème carries a matched pair of traditional iron Admiralty (or Fisherman’s) anchors, that were fitted in 1913. The previous owner never used these anchors; they were catted for their decorative good looks. However, they are fully functional and can be easily deployed. Each has 50m of chain attached. In these photos, anchors appear without stocks. They were removed to prevent damage while rafted up in busy harbours, such as at classic events. The stocks will be reinstalled in 2014 and the anchors carried ready for use.

La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner
La Bohème - Historic Swedish Schooner